Milestone-Proposal talk:Mobile Radio Propagation Model “OKUMURA-curve” and First Commercialized Full-Scale Cellular Telephone System, 1968-1979

From IEEE Milestones Wiki

Advocates and reviewers will post their comments below. In addition, any IEEE member can sign in with their ETHW login (different from IEEE Single Sign On) and comment on the milestone proposal's accuracy or completeness as a form of public review.

Original Citation Title and Text -- Administrator4 (talk) 16:09, 29 July 2022 (UTC)[edit | reply | new]

Mobile Radio Propagation Model “OKUMURA-curve” and First Commercialized Full-Scale Cellular Telephone System, 1968-1979

Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation/NTT DOCOMO, INC. (formerly Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Public Corporation) established mobile radio propagation model “OKUMURA-curve” in 1968 and commercialized the full-scale cellular telephone system based on this model for the first time in the world in 1979. OKUMURA-curve have broadly utilized for the practical design of various radio systems including 1st - 5th generation mobile communications systems.

Advocate's Initial Review -- Dmichelson (talk) 04:46, 18 March 2022 (UTC)[edit | reply | new]

The significance of the work is clear, but certain aspects need to be refined before this Milestone proposal can be submitted for History Committee approval.

The proposed citation

Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation/NTT DOCOMO, INC. (formerly Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Public Corporation) established mobile radio propagation model “OKUMURA-curve” in 1968 and commercialized the full-scale cellular telephone system based on this model for the first time in the world in 1979. OKUMURA-curve have broadly utilized for the practical design of various radio systems including 1st - 5th generation mobile communications systems.

violates many of the conventions for crafting acceptable milestones including placing too much emphasis on the corporate sponsor and conflating important ideas.

We must be clear that the purpose of a Milestone is to recognize and draw public attention to an engineering achievement, and the contributions of the profession. They are not awards, and should not be used to seek IEEE endorsement of a company's claim to priority.

We must also be clear that while a citation must stand on its own, the details can and will be elaborated upon in the corresponding Milestone web page.

Milestone proposals should be the result of historical scholarship, and should place the achievement in context. I am very concerned that the body of the proposal fails to explicitly mention that several other people were awarded the 2013 Charles Stark Draper prize including Dr. Thomas Haug (Nordic Mobile Telephony), Richard H. Frenkiel (AT&T Bell Labs), Dr. Joel S. Engel (AT&T Bell Labs), and Martin Cooper (Motorola) for “their pioneering contributions to the world’s first cellular telephone networks, systems, and standards.” NTT's work was pioneering, but not conducted in isolation.

I am also concerned that the proposal conflates the development of Okumura's path loss model with NTT DOCOMO's commercialization of the cellular telephone system. Mention of Hata is important because Okumura's hand drawn curves were insightful not particularly useful until Hata showed how they could be approximated by closed form expressions.

It is not appropriate to describe the 1979 system as belonging to NTT Docomo given that the Docomo subsidiary wasn't formed until 1992.

Okumura is a surname and should not be capitalized.

- - -

I suggest that the Milestone be split in two with one focusing on the Okumura-Hata model and the other focusing on NTT's cellular telephone system.

I have also identified an IEEE OU willing to sponsor the Okumura-Hata plaque so that this suggestion will not place undue financial pressure on the Section although responsibility for the dedication ceremony, etc. would still rest with the Section.

I further suggest that the following alternative citations that address the above concerns.

"In 1968, Okumura and his team revealed a predictable relationship between the signal loss on wireless links in urban and suburban environments and the relative placement of a base station and mobile unit. In 1978, Hata reduced these curves to formulas useful in numerical simulations. Since then, the Okumura-Hata path loss model has been an essential tool for the analysis of cellular radio systems." (64 words)

"In 1979, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone launched the first commercial 800 MHz analog cellular phone service in Tokyo. Based on car phones rather than handsets, the service soon expanded to other major cities such as Osaka and Nagoya. Together with similar systems deployed in Europe and North America a few years later, the NTT system helped to launch the cellphone revolution." (61 words)

Re: Advocate's Initial Review -- Yukihiko Okumura (talk) 20:29, 18 March 2022 (UTC)[edit | reply | new]

I would like to thank you very much for the initial review of this milestone proposal and for your valuable comments to refine the proposal.

As you pointed out, I recognized that there are problems caused by the combination of the contents related to the mobile radio propagation model “Okumura-curve” and the first commercial cellular telephone system in one milestone proposal. I also understand that in order to solve these problems, it is recommended to divide into two proposals corresponding to each content. I would like to thank you for your suggestions on the citation of each alternative proposal.

Regarding the above divided proposals, I would like to confirm the intention of Tokyo section, and I consider the description of each proposal corresponding to your comments. I would appreciate your continued support.