Difference between revisions of "Milestone-Proposal talk:Gotland HVDC Link"

(Re: Re: Re: Re: Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Ebruton (talk) 03:42, 24 August 2016 (CDT))
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Then the plinth location will be outside the fence. Please let me know when you have all the information you need for an approval.
 
Then the plinth location will be outside the fence. Please let me know when you have all the information you need for an approval.
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== wordsmithing -- [[User:Allisonmarsh|Allisonmarsh]] ([[User talk:Allisonmarsh|talk]]) 13:22, 2 October 2016 (CDT) ==
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As a non-Swede, I was confused by some of the wording.  There is room to expand, so I would suggest adding the following for context.  I also changed it out of passive voice.
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The Gotland HVDC Link was the world’s first commercial HVDC transmission link. It connected mainland Sweden to the island of Gotland.  The 96 km long cable used mass-impregnated technology and was the first submarine HVDC cable. The Swedish industrial firm ASEA produced the link for Vattenfall, the state owned utility.  The project used mercury-arc valve technology for the HVDC converters, developed by a joint ASEA-Vattenfall team led by Dr. Uno Lamm.

Revision as of 18:22, 2 October 2016

Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Ebruton (talk) 09:14, 7 February 2016 (CST)

The location of the plaque is described thus: "The HVDC link has been upgraded several times and the plaque will be mounted in connection with the existing converter station. "

Is the existing converter station the same location as the original converter station from 1954 and if so is this the original building despite the upgrade of the HVDC link? If this is a different location, can further details be provided, such as a) why this is a suitable location; and b) whether there might be alternative locations more closely connected with the 1954 HVDC link?

I would also be interested to know if any original apparatus and materials survived from the 1954 HVDC link and whether this has been preserved and possibly displayed, most probably in a local museum, and/or whether this might be possible? Might it be possible to further develop this connection if/when the plaque is mounted.

Re: Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Olof Samuelsson LU (talk) 05:51, 9 May 2016 (CDT)

Q: Is the existing converter station the same location as the original converter station from 1954 and if so is this the original building despite the upgrade of the HVDC link? A: Yes, out of three interconnected buildings visible from the street see photo Gotland HVDC entrance 20160215 135429.jpg, the center red brick building is from 1954 and so is the white building to the right. Q: If this is a different location, can further details be provided, such as a) why this is a suitable location; and b) whether there might be alternative locations more closely connected with the 1954 HVDC link? A: It is not a different location. Q: I would also be interested to know if any original apparatus and materials survived from the 1954 HVDC link and whether this has been preserved and possibly displayed, most probably in a local museum, and/or whether this might be possible? Might it be possible to further develop this connection if/when the plaque is mounted. A: Mercury arc valves from 1954 and a air-cooled thyristor valve from 1970 are on display inside just inside the entrance to the brick building together with a photo of the original control room.

Re: Re: Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Administrator4 (talk) 09:28, 5 July 2016 (CDT)

The proposal says the plaque will be mounted on the fence outside the building, which looks like chain link to me. Technically, that satisfies the requirements, but it would not be very beautiful, and equates the plaque with a "no trespassing" or "Hardhat area" type sign one would expect to find on such a fence. In addition, the plaque might be easy to steal using bolt cutters.

Would it be possible to consider some more dignified mounting, such as a stone or a plinth? Or, if the display of the valves inside the entrance to brick building is permanent and open to the public, perhaps the plaque could be mounted near the display?

Re: Re: Re: Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Olof Samuelsson LU (talk) 04:21, 22 August 2016 (CDT)

Having taken a closer look at this, the plan is use a 1,5 m tall plinth of the local (famous) limestone, cut it at 45 degrees at the top and put the plaque there. The plinth - surrounded by a flower bed - is placed 3-4 m from the fence. Alternatively - since the plinth is not easy to steal - the plinth could be placed outside the fence.

Re: Re: Re: Re: Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Ebruton (talk) 03:42, 24 August 2016 (CDT)

I am happy to approve this for a plinth with the plaque. I would prefer the plinth to be located outside the fence so it is more accessible.

=Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Approved - subject to query about location of plaque -- Olof Samuelsson LU (talk) 02:10, 7 September 2016 (CDT)=

Then the plinth location will be outside the fence. Please let me know when you have all the information you need for an approval.

wordsmithing -- Allisonmarsh (talk) 13:22, 2 October 2016 (CDT)

As a non-Swede, I was confused by some of the wording. There is room to expand, so I would suggest adding the following for context. I also changed it out of passive voice.

The Gotland HVDC Link was the world’s first commercial HVDC transmission link. It connected mainland Sweden to the island of Gotland. The 96 km long cable used mass-impregnated technology and was the first submarine HVDC cable. The Swedish industrial firm ASEA produced the link for Vattenfall, the state owned utility. The project used mercury-arc valve technology for the HVDC converters, developed by a joint ASEA-Vattenfall team led by Dr. Uno Lamm.