Difference between revisions of "Askingousponsor"

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['''Insert proposed title and plaque citation, e.g.  
 
['''Insert proposed title and plaque citation, e.g.  
  
Neutrodyne Circuit, 1922
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''Neutrodyne Circuit, 1922''
The Neutrodyne Circuit was invented on this site in 1922 by Prof. Louis Alan Hazeltine. It used neutralizing capacitors to eliminate the squeals and other noise that previously plagued radio amplifiers. The Neutrodyne made radios easier to tune. These improvements in performance and simplicity rapidly expanded radio use from amateur radio operators to a mass consumer market. By 1923, 500 stations were broadcasting to about two million listeners.''']
+
The Neutrodyne Circuit was invented on this site in 1922 by Prof. Louis Alan Hazeltine. It used neutralizing capacitors to eliminate the squeals and other noise that previously plagued radio amplifiers. The Neutrodyne made radios easier to tune. These improvements in performance and simplicity rapidly expanded radio use from amateur radio operators to a mass consumer market. By 1923, 500 stations were broadcasting to about two million listeners.'']
  
 
PROPOSED LOCATION OF THE PLAQUE:
 
PROPOSED LOCATION OF THE PLAQUE:
Stevens Institute of Technology, probably at the Babbio Center, which was built on the location of the former Electrical Engineering Building. Exact location to be determined.
+
['''describe proposed location, current site owner, street address, security considerations, etc.''']
 +
 
 
SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ACHIEVEMENT:
 
SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ACHIEVEMENT:
 
In the autumn of 1922, Prof Alan Hazeltine designed a receiver using a Tuned Radio Frequency amplifier. Joseph Freed of the Freed-Eisemann Radio Corp. built the first model from plans supplied by Hazeltine. Hazeltine demonstrated the receiver on 2 March 1923 at a meeting of the Radio Club of America at Columbia University, New York City. Hazeltine Corporation stock began trading on 1 February 1924 on the Curb Exchange (now the AMEX).  
 
In the autumn of 1922, Prof Alan Hazeltine designed a receiver using a Tuned Radio Frequency amplifier. Joseph Freed of the Freed-Eisemann Radio Corp. built the first model from plans supplied by Hazeltine. Hazeltine demonstrated the receiver on 2 March 1923 at a meeting of the Radio Club of America at Columbia University, New York City. Hazeltine Corporation stock began trading on 1 February 1924 on the Curb Exchange (now the AMEX).  

Revision as of 21:49, 5 March 2019

HERE IS SAMPLE TEXT TO USE FOR REQUESTING AN IEEE ORGANISATION'S SPONSORSHIP OF A MILESTONE. NOTE THAT EACH SITUATION MAY BE DIFFERENT. THIS IS JUST A BEGINNING POINT.


IEEE MILESTONE PROPOSAL [docket number of milestone, if not yet known or assigned, leave blank] [working title of milestone, e.g. THE NEUTRODYNE CIRCUIT, 1922]

We are asking the [insert name of IEEE organizational units] to sponsor our milestone proposal. Below is some background on the proposal.

PROPOSED CITATION: This will appear on the bronze plaque. (Note that the exact wording often changes as proposals go through the approval process.)

[Insert proposed title and plaque citation, e.g.

Neutrodyne Circuit, 1922 The Neutrodyne Circuit was invented on this site in 1922 by Prof. Louis Alan Hazeltine. It used neutralizing capacitors to eliminate the squeals and other noise that previously plagued radio amplifiers. The Neutrodyne made radios easier to tune. These improvements in performance and simplicity rapidly expanded radio use from amateur radio operators to a mass consumer market. By 1923, 500 stations were broadcasting to about two million listeners.]

PROPOSED LOCATION OF THE PLAQUE: [describe proposed location, current site owner, street address, security considerations, etc.]

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ACHIEVEMENT: In the autumn of 1922, Prof Alan Hazeltine designed a receiver using a Tuned Radio Frequency amplifier. Joseph Freed of the Freed-Eisemann Radio Corp. built the first model from plans supplied by Hazeltine. Hazeltine demonstrated the receiver on 2 March 1923 at a meeting of the Radio Club of America at Columbia University, New York City. Hazeltine Corporation stock began trading on 1 February 1924 on the Curb Exchange (now the AMEX). The Neutrodyne was a circuit with an extra capacitor and two coils, which could completely stabilize a radio frequency amplifier. The circuit was usually designed with three tuned circuits and three dials, including two stages of radio frequency (RF) amplification and a tuned detector. Since a nonregenerative detector was used, the circuit was free of patent infringement. To reduce magnetic coupling between the tuning coils, the three coils were assembled at a critical angle, mathematically derived by Hazeltine as 54.7 degrees. The three dials and the coils at this angle identified a 'Neutrodyne' receiver. The first sets were produced by Freed-Eisemann Radio Corporation in 1923, and soon there were a number of licensees paying royalties to Hazeltine. He founded a research and consulting service, and was President of the IRE (Institute of Radio Engineers) in 1936 -- John Ryder and Donald Fink, Engineers & Electrons, 1984, IEEE Press, p 76

DETAILS OF THE PROPOSAL PROCESS.

The Neutrodyne Circuit is being proposed as an IEEE Milestone by Kit August, of the IEEE New Jersey Coast Section, and Matt Tomaro, President of the IEEE Student Branch at Stevens Institute of Technology (where the invention occurred.)

There are three elements to the organizational unit support of the Milestone. 1) Payment for the cost of the plaque(s), $835 + $70 shipping. 2) Arranging the dedication ceremony, and 3) agreeing to monitor the plaque(s) and to let IEEE History Center staff know in case the plaque(s) need(s) to be moved, is no longer secure, etc. Number 3 must be done by the IEEE Section(s) in which the plaque(s) is located, however any IEEE Organizational Unit can pay for the plaque(s), and the dedication ceremony may be planned either by any IEEE entity, or by the site owner (e.g. a corporate, academic, or government organization) or combination of the IEEE entity and site owner. WHAT IS BEING ASKED OF THE NORTH JERSEY SECTION:

Agreement to cover the cost of the plaque, to help with planning the dedication ceremony, and agreeing to monitor the plaque.


Back to Milestone Guidelines